The Vikings

posted Aug 28, 2017, 3:16 PM by Viktor Zólyomi
History remembers the Vikings as a group of vicious barbarians adept at three things: looting, pillaging, and sailing. It is believed that they were the first European people to discover what we know today as America. What the history books do not record is the true purpose for their expedition across the Atlantic.

Operating as scouts of the Real Illuminati, the Vikings built a fleet of ships designed for long journeys across the seas, and used them to explore the world. The Inner Circle of the Real Illuminati had set upon them the unenviable task of finding the ideal location at which to establish the great metropolis envisioned by Alexander the Great, and the Vikings did not disappoint. By the end of the 11th century they not only set foot upon the shores of North America, the eventual home of Con City, but also brought back a detailed account of the area for the scholars of the Real Illuminati to record.

One might wonder why it is that the Real Illuminati did not build Con City immediately after the Vikings discovered America. It certainly would have made sense considering how much they wanted to keep their very existence a secret from the world. Had they built the great metropolis there and then, they could have built it up over the centuries with the help of the natives, and the European cultures would have been none the wiser. No one could keep up with the Viking ships, after all, and even if they could have, few would have dared to risk the wrath of the infamous northern savages.

Why, then, did the Real Illuminati not go down this path? The answer lies in what the Vikings told the scholars of the Real Illuminati about the lands they had discovered. It was their firm belief, that America was the perfect location at which to build the most violent, most dangerous, most barbaric city in the entire world. Given their nature, it is no surprise that they found this conclusion exhilarating, hence they communicated their findings to the scholars with the greatest enthusiasm.

The Inner Circle on the other hand was less than enthusiastic about the prospect of building the next Alexandria according to the Vikings' vision, as they meant to build a city where merchants could thrive, and they believed that extreme violence would hardly lure the richest merchants to such a place. Hence they abandoned the idea until, centuries later, one of their members read between the lines of the Viking scouts and separated the facts from the opinionated ramblings of what he perceived were `primitive northern savages.' It is thanks to him that eventually further expeditions were sent from Europe to America and, in time, Con City was established as a trade hub where merchants could thrive and multiply their fortunes, just as Alexander had envisioned.

The fact that by the early 21st century Con City and its surroundings had grown into the most violent plot of land on the planet seems to imply that the Vikings, perhaps, were not so far from the truth after all.

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